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Capability 14: Responder Safety and Health
The responder safety and health capability describes the ability to protect public health agency staff responding to an incident and the ability to support the health and safety needs of hospital and medical facility personnel, if requested.
18 products
[ HostedVideo, PDF ]

Prepare for an emergency by equipping first responders with the medication they need to safely respond to a biological incident or other public health disaster. Protect first responders while cutting down on response time.

The Bio-Pack toolkit demonstrates an effective model of medication prepositioning implemented in Montgomery County, MD.

Montgomery County Advanced Practice Center
 
[ PDF ]

Tabletop exercises are one of the strategies that the public health workforce can use to convene and engage their community partners. This resource provides state and local public health entities with information and guidance on the key ingredients to consider when developing and facilitating a bioterrorism tabletop exercise.

Dekalb County Board of Health Advanced Practice Center, revised by the San Francisco Bay Area Advanced Practice Center
 
[ Podcast, Website ]

This module provides an engaging educational experience that simulates field-based decisions related to environmental health issues for two scenarios: a major flood and a chemical spill caused by a train derailment.

Twin Cities Metro Advanced Practice Center, revised by the Mesa County Advanced Practice Center
 

[ Website ]

For this training module, environmental health professionals from around the country shared how they dealt with actual disasters and emergencies. Their real-world stories – through which they share valuable tips, techniques, and lessons learned – will guide you through the preparation, response, and recovery stages of emergencies and disasters.

Twin Cities Metro Advanced Practice Center
 
[ Website, Podcast, PowerPoint, Word, PDF ]

This web-based training course focuses on the role of environmental health professionals in emergency preparedness.

Divided into two modules, “Emergency Preparedness and Response Fundamentals” and “Putting Principles into Practice,” this course addresses basic environmental health concepts important to front-line staff with years of experience as well as those new to the field.

Twin Cities Metro Advanced Practice Center, revised by the Toledo-Lucas County Health Department Advanced Practice Center
 

[ Word ]

This “Best Practices Resource Guide” will help public health agencies develop and implement special policies and procedures during an emergency. Please note that this tool is currently being revised and a new version will be released in 2012.

Dekalb County Board of Health Advanced Practice Center, revised by the Multnomah County Advanced Practice Center
 

[ PDF ]

Does your agency have an environmental health emergency response plan? The Environmental Health Emergency Response Guide can complement existing emergency plans or serve as a foundation when developing a new environmental health emergency response plan. The guide addresses 15 environmental health-related topics and describes the potential roles for environmental health professionals during an emergency or disaster.

Twin Cities Metro Advanced Practice Center, revised by the Mesa County Advanced Practice Center
 

[ Website ]

This compendium highlights information on environmental health issues likely to be faced during emergencies and is organized around the major functional areas of environmental health.

Twin Cities Metro Advanced Practice Center
 
[ PDF, Word, HostedVideo, Podcast ]

Inclusive Just-in-Time Training (I-JITT) for Mass Prophylaxis/POD Operations is a comprehensive and systematic toolkit designed to support individuals leading and responding to a public health emergency. Its approach to training is aligned with best practice from the field of adult learning theory.

The toolkit consists of five components: Implementation Instructions for the Preparedness Planner, an Operational Briefing Checklist for the Mass Prophylaxis/POD Supervisor, a Field Training Guide for Team Leaders (complete with Job Action Sheets), a “Go-Guide” job aide for surge responders to utilize during an incident, and a short evaluation form to evaluate the I-JITT approach.

Multnomah County Advanced Practice Center
 

[ Website ]

The IDER Toolkit is for local health department staff and others involved in planning and preparing for infectious disease emergencies. The toolkit integrates key elements of communicable disease control and prevention with emergency management principles, and provides a customizable, ready-to-go infectious disease emergency response plan via a variety of functional forms and templates.

San Francisco Bay Area Advanced Practice Center
 
[ PDF, Word ]
Intended for use by local health departments (LHDs) as part of a multi-sector effort to coordinate planning for and response to a pandemic influenza outbreak, the 60-page guide offers the following: An overview of key issues that should be considered for inclusion in a local jurisdiction's pandemic influenza plan. An examination within each issue area of questions that should be asked, ideas on where to find information that may be needed, and partners that could be consulted to address those topics within the plan. Examples of ways in which other jurisdictions have addressed the topics described in the guide. Links to information that can be used to further investigate the topics or resources that can be used to customize tools for individual jurisdictions. At the core of this guide are plans developed by departments that host two of NACCHO's Advanced Practice Centera, cutting-edge learning laboratories that develop and test tools that help other LHDs tackle all-hazards preparedness. Santa Clara County, California and Seattle-King County, Washington, have both produced notably comprehensive, but very different, plans addressing pandemic influenza that serve as the foundation of this document's findings.
Santa Clara County Advanced Practice Center
 
[ CD ]
This comprehensive toolkit evolved from recognition of the need for communities to increase their preparedness for managing mass fatalities. Its focus—the care and management of the dead—is one of the most difficult aspects of disaster response and recovery operations. Toolkit materials are based on lessons learned from actual events, including the Oklahoma City bombing, 9/11, and Hurricane Katrina. The toolkit provides scalable, operational direction and tools to guide jurisdictions in creating a local plan. Highlights include: Identification of stakeholders involved in mass fatality management and recommendations for a planning process that is co-led by public health and the medical examiner/coroners office; Specific guidelines for all medical examiner/coroner responsibilities at the incident site, morgue, and family assistance center Guidance on infection and other health and safety threats; and Requirements and recommendations for managing mass fatalities during a worst-case scenario pandemic influenza.
Santa Clara County Advanced Practice Center
 

[ Podcast, Website ]

Master the Disaster!LIVE (MTD!/LIVE) is an online, web-based tool that will run on any computer platform (Windows, Linux, or Mac) that offers a simplified, step-by-step process for creating your own customized tabletop exercise (TTX) slide presentation for several chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear (CBRN) and natural disaster scenarios.

Tarrant County Advanced Practice Center
 
[ Website, PDF, HostedVideo, Podcast ]
This online training module serves as a companion to our APC white paper on Inclusive Just-in-Time training as well as a primer for LHD leaders and administrators in understanding the model of I-JITT and how it can be adopted, adapted, and tailored in their organization. Learning Objectives By the end of this training, the learner should be able to: Define Inclusive Just-In-Time Training (JITT) Describe how to apply Inclusive JITT in a public health response Explain the importance of incorporating Inclusive JITT into ongoing organizational training and preparedness efforts Describe how to adopt Inclusive JITT at the local level The online module uses the example of Susan, a health administrator, and the type of training she received during a mass vaccination event. Additionally, through the use of video, the module reinforces the learnings and provides examples to illustrate visually, the concepts within. Contained within the course are knowledge checks and interactive activities intended to stimulate the learners in applying the content in the module.
Multnomah County Advanced Practice Center
 
[ Word ]
POD 1: The Mechanics of a POD; POD 2: Facilitating Clients Through a POD. This training is designed to develop knowledge and skills by drawing upon participant experience and expertise. This approach is well suited for an audience of local public health and MRC volunteers who are leaders either within their departments or in their communities.
Cambridge Advanced Practice Center
 

[ CD, PowerPoint, PDF ]
Introduction to Public Health for Local Partners and Stakeholders is a CD training tool that introduces police and fire/EMS cadets to the principles of public health, with particular emphasis on the roles and responsibilities of public health during an emergency. This course reinforces the collaborative nature of emergency preparedness and the critical need to work together to ensure a coordinated, efficient community response. It contains both a didactic piece and Train-the-Trainer notes on public health, preparedness, Strategic National Stockpile (SNS), epidemiology, and isolation and quarantine. In addition to the didactic piece, there are two scenarios -- avian influenza and white powder incident -- to help demonstrate how and where public health and law enforcement interface. This tool was pilot tested among Tarrant County police and fire/EMS, and the material for this tool is used on a regular basis at police academies to teach cadets. At each session pre- and post-tests were conducted to determine if cadets truly gained some knowledge from these sessions; all sessions demonstrated improvement from pre- to post-test. All classroom sessions provide course evaluation feedback forms, as well, that are used for course improvements and adjustments.
Tarrant County Advanced Practice Center
 
[ PowerPoint ]
Responding to Chemical and Radiological Disasters – A Self-Paced Training Course is an interactive CD training tool targeted at public health and healthcare professionals. It is organized along two basic learning tracks starting with the basics of radiation and toxicology, followed by the role of public health in radiological disasters, and more detailed training on radiological and chemical incidents. All-hazards modules introducing mass triage, decontamination and the use of personal protective equipment are also included. The CD contains supplemental videos and additional training resources from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and OSHA.
Tarrant County Advanced Practice Center
 

[ PDF, Word, PowerPoint, HostedVideo ]
This three-volume set is a collection of training and tutorial material compiled for awareness level training on how to respond to incidences involving nuclear, radiological or chemical weapons of mass destruction (WMD). The material was created from a variety of government, university, and private foundation sources specializing in WMD emergency preparedness. It is targeted at three distinct audiences involved in emergency response: public health staff, medical ER staff, and fire/first responders. It also contains a training section for trainers who may present the material as provided, or may customize from the various sections to emphasize certain emergency response concepts as needed. Users should first review the README file, study the tutorial modules in Appendix A, step through the training presentation slides in the folder for their particular background interest, then take the post-training tests in Appendix B. Tutorial tests are also provided at the end of each module in Appendix A and may be submitted to the University of North Texas Health Sciences Center Office of Professional and Continuing Education for CME/CEU credits.
Tarrant County Advanced Practice Center